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The Labrador Retriever Guide is not intended to replace the advice of a Veterinarian or other pet Professional. This site accepts advertising and other forms of compensation for products mentioned. Such compensation does not influence the information or recommendations made. We always give our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experiences. © 2018 Labrador-Retriever-Guide.com.

What Max’s foster says: Max is an owner surrender from the Santa Cruz shelter and appears to be a very well bred English Labrador. He is not very tall but has those adorable thick English features we love: a big blocky head, wiggly otter tail, massive paws, luxuriously silky coat and a joyful labby smile full of sparkling white teeth. He’s still very much a big puppy who’s just starting to settle into a daily routine.

Fox red is another unusual color. It’s technically not a different color, just a very dark version of yellow. These dark yellow or reddish individuals used to be much more common, which made them less desirable than the pale yellow individuals. Breeders began to selectively breed for the light blonde dogs until the rufus-colored coat now has its turn to be a rare gem.

I know you’ve said your funds are low, but you really do need to find a way to take your lab to the vet. If it is HD, arthritis, or another joint problem, then you need to know! Only a professional diagnosis and advice can tell what the problem is and it’s crucial you do find out as different medical issues require different treatment and care. The advice you would get from a vet isn’t something you can replace with others advice from the web I’m afraid…so please, really do find a way to get her to the vet.

Your black Labrador retriever’s fur needs routine care, but whether black, yellow or chocolate, a Labrador’s coat is easily maintained. Like all double-coated dogs, he’ll shed some hair continuously. He’ll blow his soft undercoat annually, at which time you may have more Labrador retriever fur on you than he does.

Hi, we have owned a number of Labradors over the years Golds and blacks we also have had Weimaraners always males. Now after many years of dog ownership we have girls born one day apart a Chocolate Labrador and a Weimaraner who definetly come as a pair.

What Opal’s owner says: Opal is a very smart, very active, beautiful 3 year old Chocolate Lab. She needs a home where she can move! Going on runs and playing in the ocean or lake keep her happy. She would do very well with an owner or family that got her out moving a lot! She is very hyper and needs her exercise so that she can feel calm and happy. Opal has been a great dog for us but as our family grew and our little ones took up so much of our time and energy she wasn’t getting what she really needs to thrive. We are beyond heartbroken to pass her on but know that it is better for her. We think she would be happiest in a family without another dog (so she can be the center of attention) and with kids middle school age and up, or no kids at all. She loves spending time indoors with her family as well as in the yard. She is fine with cats, curious but mostly impartial unless it’s a cat she doesn’t know, then she will definitely want to check it out. She has been put in her place by our kitty and knows the consequences if she annoys the family cat (hisssss 😉 She tends to be the alpha in most social situations with other dogs but has never shown any aggression, she’s just the boss. We hope she can find the perfect home where she can flourish!!

My Chocolate male is Maximus. I raised him on a bottle due to his black mother rejecting him and his yellow and chocolate brothers. I raised his mother from a pup and his yellow father also. His mother died from complications from birth, but she was highly intelligent, very sweet, and stubborn as the day is long. Never was able to get very far in training with her. His father is the same with the exception of a strong working drive that I played on to train enough to hunt, but very stubborn as well. I also raised Maximus’s Aunt she is black and dumb as a brick and an exceptional pet due to her very loving spirit. Now Maximus’s grandfather on his mother’s side I had the absolute pleasure of having. He was black and amazing in every aspect. Now I trained Maximus starting from about 4 weeks. He is now fully trained in every way. He knows every word you say and is without doubt the smartest and most perfect dog I have ever had including his grandfather. His chocolate brother was also bottle raised and is now a day to day diabetic certified service dog and fully obedience trained in every way. His yellow brother was much like his father. Smart enough, but not exceptional by any means and was raised the same as the two chocolate males. So I have to say after years of having black and yellow I will favor chocolate from here out. At least in my family of labs. By the way only one of my dogs have had Akc registration..and I would put Maximus and his chocolate brother Milo against any dog out there for anything you require. On a side note she had 10 pups..6 were stillborn she killed one(black) she had all colors) the vet saved the last 3 when she saw what was happening with the mom(rejection from pain of complications). Next pup I keep will be from Maximus one day and I will hand pick him and bottle raise from 7 days on. Doesn’t affect health..the brothers all weigh about 85lbs at 14 months. Never learned moms bad habits.

If you are considering getting one breed or the other, make sure of what type you want before you begin your search. I have a personal preference for the ordinary hunting types because they have a nice combination of lively energy and ability to turn it off when appropriate. Some people prefer the much higher energy of the field lines, some people prefer the much more laidback temperaments of the  conformation (also called bench) lines.

There are divisions within each breed between show lines, field lines, guide/service dog breedings, and etc…. Labs are widely considered easier to train, but both breeds take very well to training. Retriever folk like to say: “You tell a Lab; you ask a Chessie; you negotiate with a Golden”.

Max has met several neighbor dogs (male and female) and really wants to be social, but is not very experienced with greetings yet. He seems to be more comfortable with larger, well-balanced dogs. He is a little too interested in our 2 resident cats for now but longer term, he may be workable. He’ll definitely need close supervision with other dogs (and kids) while his post-neuter hormones settle a bit.

Just recently (24th July 2015) TheLabradorSite.com has published a more detailed, fact filled and fun article looking at the chocolate Labrador that’s worth checking out: The Chocolate Labrador Retriever – Myths, Facts, and Fun

its perfectly normal behavior sometimes they like to ignore and they most certainly have a mind of there own ! My now 9 year old yellow lab closie used to do the same and now she is a stalker ha ha ! Have fun and love every day of it !

I have never owned a lab or a golden but we do have a Golden Lab as part of our family. He’s smart, confident, friendly and athletic. I have friends with Goldens that can be a bit nervous and neurotic and I find labs are sometimes a little standoffish. I think the Golden Lab is the best of both worlds.

The Vietnam War is the only war in American history in which US war dogs, which were officially classified by the military as “military working dogs,” were not allowed to officially return home after the war.[87] Classified as expendable equipment, of the approximate 4,000 US K-9s deployed to the Vietnam War, it is estimated that only about 200 US war dogs survived Vietnam to be put into service at other outposts stationed overseas.[88] Aside from these 200 or so, the remaining canines who were not killed in action were either euthanised or left behind.[89]

Nail trimming and ear cleaning should also be a regular part of your grooming routine. Labs generally need to be bathed less frequently than Goldens, which reduces the number of regular grooming tasks for potential owners concerned about overall maintenance time.

Many people believe the Chocolate Labrador Retriever doesn’t have the famous hard-working and intelligent ways of the blacks and yellows. Some say they’re stubborn, unwilling to be trained, or simply a little stupid!

I have “owned” both breeds. Had one perfect Golden for over 12 years, then 2 more before we went dogless for a couple years. Fell in love with a big black Lab pup who became part of our hearts and started to turn us into Lab fanatics. Love the kindly Goldens, but found they tend to get fat more easily, and the long hair is harder to keep looking good. I now have 3 Labs – one of each color, ages 9, 3 and 2. Grooming is a cinch and I disagree with the shedding statement…..maybe it’s a question of diet or grooming but it’s not a great problem for us, even with 3 dogs. The yellow male definitely does shed more than our black or chocolate. The Labs are indeed, less likely to get their feelings hurt, and tolerate chaos when the grandchildren or other visitors bring their dogs. And, because they’ve always had lots of freedom with daily outings off lead, they will not let me out of their sight when in the woods or fields. They run and chase but if I turn back one step, they are immediately at my side. Once a Lab is bonded to you, their faithfulness is legendary. Each breed….Goldens, German Shepherds or Labs are each wonderful, but the easy to train, easy to care for, stable Lab will always be the breed for me!

I have a male chocolate lab he’s going on 6 months old and I noticed that when he wants to go to bed he loves his kennel he starts biting when he knows he’s not allowed to buy for still started licking me a lot then I’ll start biting me and he’s like a child he said put me to bed he knows out just sit back and learn that at two months so I think it’s all in the person training them because he’s an amazing voice

Background: Preici is a happy and playful female lab looking for an active owner that can keep her regularly engaged in activities where she gets the exercise and interaction that she loves. Since she was a puppy she has enjoyed a wonderful life playing fetch, swimming, playing with other dogs at home and at dog parks, and spending time with her owner, but the owner needs to move and can’t take her along. The owner contacted GGLRR to be sure Preici is placed in a good home.

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Labrador retrievers, according to the Dog Breed Info website, are one of most popular breeds of dog in the United States. Intelligent canines, Labrador retrievers are known to posses loyal, loving, willing and affectionate temperaments. This dog breed consists of three different groups, one of which is the black Labrador.

Puppies who come of age in warmer months are introduced to swimming in a stress-free manner designed to eliminate fear of the water, promote the puppy’s confidence in his own swimming ability, and teach the puppy how and where to exit the pool easily.

Buddy is one of the sweetest and loving young labs that we have ever met. His owners got Buddy and his brother as puppies and Buddy has been a loved and cherished family member. About two years ago, Buddy started having seizures (epilepsy). The family has three young children and are not in a position to provide the appropriate care for Buddy. While they love Buddy very much, the family is placing him with GGLRR to find a home that is a better fit.

Hi! My name is Max! I am looking for a new parent or family that can put the same energy into me that I put into retrieving balls and toys. Let’s play! Let’s run or hike! Let’s train together! Then maybe we can relax and chill afterward. Maybe.

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**All dogs are individuals. Our ratings are generalizations, and they’re not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids, and personality. No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances. Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period.

Our labrador is 13 years old although he doesn’t look it. He is having the classic signs of ageing: arthritis and some loss of hearing, a new symptom appeared recently. Some nights after we go to sleep he seems to get a bit agitated and disoriented, he paces the floor going back and forth, I’ve tried talking to him and rubbing him gently on his back but it doesn’t help. The Vet gave us a medication for anxiety Alprazolam 1 mg and it does work. I’m reluctant to give it to him regularly so I only use it when he begins to get agitated. We also give him Gloucosamine. I’ll be grateful if you have any comments to share.

I know socialization is most important in the very first days and weeks of life, but a dog never stops learning. And in your case your Lab needs to learn a bit more respect around other dogs. The only way he will do this is to be around other dogs and learn their social code.

HIGH: Active dogs who are unfortunately prone to obesity, Labs need a lot of exercise to keep them in top physical condition and to prevent them from acting out. Twenty minutes of vigorous exercise should do the trick, either running, fetching, swimming or play. At the very least, spend 10 or 15 minutes throwing a ball for your lab.

It could be down to a number of things. Have you by chance spoken to a vet? Obviously that’s the nest recommended course of action. However, some things that could be the cause or at least contributing are: – Low quality diet, too many shampoo baths with the wrong product, minor allergy to something, yeast infection or other skin condition.

What Millie’s and Brutus’ rep says: We would love to see both dogs adopted together with a family who is active. These dogs will make amazing running and hiking companions. They should not go to a house with very small kids since in Brutus’ playing he will sometimes jump to ask you to join in the game.

Lab and golden mixes are often available for adoption at your local shelter. If you adopt a mixed-breed dog, you can always use a dog DNA test (this oneis a fan favorite) to get more insight into their unique heritage.

There is no global registry of Labradors, nor is there detailed information on numbers of Labradors living in each country. The countries with the five largest numbers of Labrador registrations as of 2005 are: 1: United Kingdom 2: France and United States (approximately equal), 4: Sweden, 5: Finland.[85][86] Sweden and Finland have far lower populations than the other three countries, suggesting that as of 2005 these two countries have the highest proportion of Labradors per million people: As there is no global registry for Labradors, it is difficult to ascertain whether there is simply a smaller percentage of people formally registering their animals in countries like the United States, or whether the number of animals per capita is actually smaller.

By the way, if you are curious to know how we get yellow pups, click on this link: Coat color inheritance in Labrador Retrievers  you’ll also find some more fun facts there about chocolate Labradors, including how two chocolate labs can sometime have yellow puppies, and some great coat color charts to make things easier to understand.

Labrador retrievers are widely acknowledged as intelligent dogs. However, according to the Labrador Retriever Guide website, many individuals believe that black Labradors, as opposed to their yellow and chocolate counterparts, are the smartest within the breed.

The Labrador Site is also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

It does go both ways though because… I’ve met plenty of Labs that didn’t make a sound unless they needed too, but then I’ve met some that won’t be quiet for anything. I guess it really just depends..

So you need to watch for the signs of over-exertion, and that your dog may not be up to it anymore and know when it’s time to cut back. Some dogs may suffer joint problems from a puppy and not be able to enjoy 2 mile runs, others who have had a life of great care, high nutrition and regular exercise may be running 10 miles still at the age of 10. Like us, dogs are individual.

Labs also see veterinarians frequently because they have eaten something they shouldn’t. It’s not unusual for Labs to undergo multiple surgeries to remove hand towels, toys, corn cobs and other items they’ve swallowed that then cause an intestinal blockage.

They also found that the lesser Newfie was useful for serving as the occasional tow barge. The strength and endurance of this breed was never lost to size. Also of great benefit to fishermen were the natural physical traits the lesser and greater Newfoundlands shared. Both are equipped with webbed toes and a two-layered coat, with a top-coat that repels water, and a tail that is broad at the base, serving as a sort of rudder while swimming.

In answer to question 1: For moral reasons I have to stay away from giving anything but the most basic of health advice. I’m not a qualified vet and besides this, I’ve not seen your girl to be able to give any kind of informed opinion. It would be horrific for you to receive incorrect advice from me (or anywhere else on the internet) that meant an underlying health issue went undiagnosed. So if you have worries that your girl isn’t dealing with the heat as well as she should be, please see and discuss this with your vet, to get the correct advice and hopefully to put your mind at ease.

Golden Retriever- Goldens are one of the best family pets to have, they are the lowest ranking barkers. So, no complaints from the neighbors about the noise level. They are one of the freshest smelling dogs as they do not suffer from bad breath, which is a common problem among dogs usually. For more information go through  Page on www.dogspot.in

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Those traits are the foundation of the Lab’s personality, but each dog puts his own spin on them. Some are serious, some are clowns, some are reserved, some never meet a stranger. You might hear that Lab personalities vary by color, but it’s more likely that a dog’s temperament is affected by the breeder’s goals. Labs from breeders who produce top-winning field-trial dogs are more demanding when it comes to exercise and training. They are unsuited to lying around the house all day while everyone is at work or school. More laid back Labs typically come from a breeder who shows dogs in conformation.

Keep some special tools handy for when your Lab starts blowing his undercoat. Use a short-hair rake to loosen the soft fluff, but be careful not to rake his sensitive skin — that smarts. A slicker brush, used like a carding comb for wool, will lift out most of the shed undercoat. Follow this with a fine-tooth comb on his body to extract any remaining loose hair. Use a wide-tooth comb on that thick otter tail.

The Flattie has a high cancer rate and their gene pool is small. Luckily, it’s not something I spend a lot of time thinking about except when I see the proliferation of show Labs in parks here, usually overweight and with shorter legs than the working Labs. Don’t understand why they are more common than the working ones.

Begin accustoming your Goldador to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently – dogs are touchy about their feet – and look inside his mouth and ears. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

We have a Beautiful intelligent 1 year old chocolate Labrador “Brontė” she would be a fantastic helper dog, as she is well behaved, gentle and so willing to please!! She has brought so much love & laughter into our family! Chocolate Labradors are fantastic Xxx

I have been looking for yellow female lab puppy and it has been a nightmare. We had are 2nd yellow female lab HoneyBear for 12 1/2 years. She passed last January. Labrador’s are Beautiful, Loving and the best friend a soul could ever ask. Honey(Pooh Bear) was something she could spell, walk herself on her lead, fetch the keys for a ride, regardless if it was below zero weather windows down head, ears and cheeks flapping in the wind. While you’re up front with the heater full blast and freezing. Pooh was special I could write a book on her sure miss my girl.

There are 3 colors of the Labrador Retriever, black, yellow (which can have an appearance of light cream to fox red) and chocolate (which can be a lighter chocolate or darker chocolate). Silver is NOT a color, Champagne is not a color (at times you may see a yellow being referred to as having a shade variation that matches what champagne, or Dom Perignon, looks like), white is not a color (this is a lightest shade variation of yellow) and Charcoal is not a color. Regardless of the catch words and buzz words that unscrupulous people (who call themselves “breeders”) are using to dupe the public into thinking the rhetoric spewed means responsible breeders are wrong and liars about their “truth,” is false. It has been argued the dilute gene causing these shades is in all Labradors rather than understanding the silver Labrador is a cross between a Weimaraner and Labrador. This argument is futile. If this were true, breeders of yesteryear, breeders of today who have been breeding for 20, 30, 40, 50 years, wonderful examples and teachers for the new breeder (both in show conformation and field work) would also have been producing this. They are not. For these same people that pretend this is a pure bred Labrador and who also say these true stewards of the breed, hundreds and thousands of people around the world, are actually producing this “color” but “cull” them out (kill them), is preposterous. Please do not fall for this scam. Please protect the Labrador Retriever which comes in three colors with different shades, black, yellow, and chocolate.

Labradors tend to be very active. They were originally bred to be working or hunting dogs, so they crave exercise. Regular walks and runs, a good hike, going swimming, or a visit to the dog park are all good ways to soothe a Black Lab’s need for speed.

In November 2000, President Bill Clinton signed into law an amendment that allowed retired US military working dogs (war dogs) to be adopted by personnel outside of the military, leaving the Vietnam War as the only war in US history in which American war dogs never returned home.[88][96]

I’d love to hear about your own chocolate labrador, so do drop your story in the comments box below, or post his or her photo up on our Facebook page or in the forum.  Tell us what is so special about your chocolate labrador and why you think chocolate labs are the best.

Up for sale is aHagen Renaker Chocolate Lab Pup, item number 38883. It is new and is still on it’s factory display card. Just soak the card in water and it comes right off for easy displaying. This little cutie has great color and detail throughout.

There is a reason that year after year, the Labrador Retriever is the most popular dog breed in the United States. The history of the Labrador Retriever dates back to the early 1800’s in Newfoundland, just off the Atlantic coast of Canada. Today’s Lab is a product of the breed being imported to England by the First and Second Dukes of Malmesbury and the 5th and 6th Dukes of Buccleuch as Water Fowl Retrievers. Had these families not played a vital part in the continuation of the breed, the loving and affectionate Labs we have all grown to love may not exist today.

With adequate exercise, these versatile companions can handle anything from a small city apartment to a vast ranch. What they can’t handle is isolation: if you get a Lab, make him a member of your family, not an outdoor dog.

Be mindful of asking less of your Lab in old age. They will likely still try to chase a tennis ball all day and hike mountains just to please you, even if it may be doing them more harm than good. Try not to put them in this position.

We have an 18 yr old female lab who also lost control over her bladder & bowels. We switched her to boiled chicken & rice (about 60% rice) and she is doing much better. She may have an accident maybe 1 time a week now. We changed her eating schedule as well, she gets 1 1/2 cups of boiled chicken & rice in the morning and 3/4 cup in the evening. Making sure she has plenty of time to go outside & do her business before we leave for work in the morning or before going to bed at night. We also give her Cosequin twice a day (one in the morning & one at night) to help with aches & pains, but please check with your vet before giving your dog any supplements.

Some breeds have hearty appetites and tend to put on weight easily. As in humans, being overweight can cause health problems in dogs. If you pick a breed that’s prone to packing on pounds, you’ll need to limit treats, make sure he gets enough exercise, and measure out his daily kibble in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.

If the name Elvis brings to mind the Elvis Presley song “Hound Dog”, well put that out of your mind! Elvis isn’t crying all the time, (although he would probably be quite interested in a rabbit!) but one look at the lovely Lab face with the longer hound ears, and you’ll be singing his praises! Elvis was found in Tuolumne and sent off to the shelter in San Jose. He’s a sweet boy. He has a wonderful bark that’s half bark/half bay, which makes you laugh to hear it. He’s a beautiful black color with brindle highlights. He gets along well with his foster siblings, and is learning the rules of the house, including how to walk well on a correction collar. He is attracted to squirrels and cats when they walk by but he’s learning! We think Elvis once had a home with someone who cared for him, as he responds to correction and does know some commands (and he likes to sit on the couch!). How he ended up lost is a mystery to us, but his foster mom has noticed that if something interests him, he will bolt after it, and his recall is not great. (We’re working on it!).

It is sometimes hard to get a good recall trained, perhaps the hardest thing in fact as usually you are trying to call them away from some form of unique fun and it comes to an end when called. Have you tried a recall training programme? Right from basics working up to harder difficulty?

The coat is perfect for keeping warm and dry but can be a bit of a nightmare for owners when the Labrador sheds its coat twice a year. For anyone who has had a Labrador, you’re familiar with endless fur that piles up in heaps during brushing session!

The Newfoundland dog during the days of the St. John’s dog was not the contemporary breed as we recognize it. The Newfoundland is a distinctly Canadian breed and yet even today, the Newfoundland in Canada remains true to its origins and only comes in two colors, Black, and Landseer, neither of which is dilute. The dilute allele was likely introduced into the Canadian Newfoundland after it was exported to Europe and crossed with mastiff breeds after the Labrador was already established as an individual breed. Since the first Chesapeake Bay Retriever ( a bitch) was imported to Great Britain by Dr. Helen Inglesby in the 1930’s, this is also evidence debunking the claim that the Labrador was developed by crossing the Newfoundland with the Chesapeake Bay Retriever, and is patently not accurate.

According to a 2011 study, 13 out of 245 Labradors studied were heterozygous for the M264V mutation responsible for the melanistic mask, and one was homozygous. Within the breed, this trait is not visible.[36]

Also, lots of goldens have skin issues. Mine doesn’t, but some do. You also have to keep their ears impeccably clean. If I go too long between cleaning Tazzie’s they get funky and smell gross. But as long as you keep up on it they’re fine.

IT MEASURES 1 3/4″ WIDE X 1 3/8″ X 7/8″ “TALL”. AS YOU CAN SEE IN PICTURES IT HAS THE NAME “LABRADOR RETRIEVER” EMBOSSED (IN REVERSE) ACROSS THE BOTTOM. THE BLACKISH COLOR ON THE SIDES IS THE INK FROM PREVIOUS USE.

My chocolate lab is 18 months old. She has definitely calmed down from where she used to be but still has lots of puppy in her. A bit of a stubborn streak too. I sure don’t miss all the puppy biting! She had me in tears more than once. It was way worse than any dog I’ve ever had. But she has learned the art of ‘soft mouth’ so now she’s a pleasure to wrestle with. Not much of a hugger. She really doesn’t like a lot of hugs/kisses except first thing when we wake up. Other than that, she’s fairly independent. She loves to play tricks on us. I swear she is constantly scamming us – keep-away is her favorite. And perish the thought you leave a pair of socks around. They’ll be gone! She is our baby, no other kids in the house anymore. And spoiled rotten!

You’re looking for a level-headed, lovable family dog. Retrievers are among the most popular breeds in America, and they’d make a good choice. But how do you choose between a Labrador or a golden? They’re incredibly similar, sharing intelligence, athleticism, and that goofy personality that dog lovers, well, love! To help you make an informed decision, we’ve created an easy-to-read guide about these two water dogs.

Regardless of the brand of food she is on, if she’s gaining weight you should cut back on the portion sizes. Extra weight is definitely not doing her any favors. You can be fairly sure cutting down on her food intake will do no harm because if she’s gaining weight, she must be consuming excess calories and the only way to stop that is to cut down on the food she eats or add in more exercise, likely a little of both. Feeding her less will be harder on you than it is on her. She will be fine eating less, but will likely give you those puppy eyes every time there’s anything remotely edible in view. Just don’t give in!

Your pet needs a hook too! His or her leash or collar can hang with this great dog shaped pet leash and collar hook. In the shape of a labrador, this cast iron hook is perfect for pets and humans alike.

This versatile breed is gentle enough to be a family dog, driven enough to be a sporting dog, and intelligent enough to excel as guide dogs, police K9s, and search and rescue dogs. The breed standards include three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate.

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Buddy is one of the sweetest and loving young labs that we have ever met. His owners got Buddy and his brother as puppies and Buddy has been a loved and cherished family member. About two years ago, Buddy started having seizures (epilepsy). The family has three young children and are not in a position to provide the appropriate care for Buddy. While they love Buddy very much, the family is placing him with GGLRR to find a home that is a better fit.

Brutus loves to play ball and can do it for hours non-stop. Even in the house, he will ask you to play. If there are no balls, then Brutus will play with socks. He will find any socks lying around and loves throwing them into the air and catching them again. It is heartwarming to see how happy he can be with this game! Millie will play a bit, particularly if Brutus is playing and she wants to play with him (with the ball, or the socks!). Brutus is a bit more timid and highly affectionate. Less than a week with us, he gently weeps when he sees one of us leave, and welcomes us back home as if he has known us forever and not seen us in years. He will then shadow whoever returned asking for affection. He will move his head up to be scratched under the chin.

Ive been a Lab man for over 45yrs now they are with out a doubt the most loyal companion a person can have.I am working on my first chocolate lab,maggie she was born to her black mother also my dog 1 1/2 yrs ago there were two chocolate pups in a litter of 10.From the minute they were born the two chocolate pups were stronger and smarter than the black pups.Maggie has been a piece of cake to train picks things up as soon as she is asked she has taught me how to hunt smarter she will retrieve anything,a lot faster than my other two black labs who are bigger she will work any type of brush no matter how thick or steep and her nose is soo good nothing gets passed by she flushes game out of the thick stuff after other dogs have gone thru,She is the best guard dog I have ever had very protective ,I feel safe at night knowing she would with out a doubt sink her teeth in any stranger sneaking into the house at night she has taught my older dogs how to do everything better even staying on the property.I can not wait for her to have pups so i can get another chocolate Lab they are awesome!!

The first St. John’s dog was said to be brought to England in or around 1820, but the breed’s reputation had already spread to England; there is a story that the 2nd Earl of Malmesbury saw a St. John’s dog on a fishing boat and immediately made arrangements with traders to have some of these dogs imported to England. These ancestors of the first labradors so impressed the Earl with their skill and ability for retrieving anything within the water and on shore that he devoted his entire kennel to developing and stabilising the breed.[17]

In the UK, if you visit a driven pheasant shoot or a grouse moor, you’ll see black Labs vastly outnumbering their yellow cousins. Brown dogs are few and far between.  This is starting to change, but only just.

7) They are less “one person” than a Lab, and have a tendency to be flakey and run up to everyone they see and treat that person as their long lost best friend- I hate this, personally, but I know others like it. This is the one thing I don’t like about Goldens.

Labrador Retrievers have short, water-resistant double coats. They are somewhat heavy, seasonal shedders, but Labrador Retrievers don’t need much in the way of professional grooming. Plan to brush them about once a week and bathe them as needed.

I have a 4 and a half year old yellow lab and we enjoy every minute with him. He loves hiking and food very good family dog and well behaved couldn’t as for a better dog. His name is Jersey and he’s a male..

Labradors tend to get bored when left alone indoors for too long. This can lead to listlessness and destructiveness from all the unspent energy and lack of attention. This breed is happiest and healthiest with plenty of exercise and outdoor play.

They are so soft-mouthed that they can carry a raw egg in their mouths without breaking it. Given these positive traits, Labs are ideal family dogs, providing loyal companionship to adults and children.

Labs typically live between 10 to 14 years old and many factors can impact your labrador’s lifespan. First, genetics play an important factor. Some labs are health screened; some are not. The most common types of health screening include hip scores and eye tests. Ask the breeder directly if your puppy’s parents have been screened for health conditions. Various health screenings may include: The Optigen Test which screens for blindness, the CNM which tests for Autosomal Recessive Centronuclear Myopathy, an inherited neuromuscular disorder, EIC Exercise Induced Collapse, which tests for loss of muscle control during exercise and Macular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD), a painful eye condition. Second, the color of your labrador–whether it’s yellow, chocolate or black–will not impact lifespan. Third, adding a fence to your property helps labs live a longer life because they’re safer, controlled space. Fourth, proper training, such as training your lab to come when called, can help keep your pet safe, which helps with a longer life. Finally, vaccinations help prevent serious diseases which can shorten your labrador’s lifespan. 

What Mozzie’s owner says: Mozzie is a very friendly, loving dog that loves attention and would love to sit on your lap. He is great with my eight-year-old daughter; he does get excited and forget his size around smaller kids. Mozzie loves to run and play fetch; he will bring the ball back to you. He lives with two other dogs, is very friendly with other dogs he has met at the park and playdates. Mozzie does get excited when he sees other dogs when out for a walk on a leash. We have cats that live in the house; he is fine with them, if he sees a cat, squirrel, or rabbit in the yard he will chase them. Mozzie has had basic training and understands quite a few commands. He will sit and wait nicely for his food. Mozzie spends his day in the house when I am at work, he is crate trained, but he does not need to be crated when left alone. Like most labs, Mozzie loves the water. One thing to know about Mozzie he does like socks, and he will eat them.

I really think a large part of this is training and not the color of their fur. Im not a professional trainer by any stretch (first dog in quite awhile) but I have worked with Bailey to some extent everyday since we got her at 7.5 weeks old. She makes it very easy as well. She was following basic commands at a very young age and completely house broke in a few short weeks. She has pretty much always retrieved since she wa big enough to carry whatever was being thrown. She now at 4 months is retrieving from the water and I am very proud of her. I will be starting double retreives soon and have no worries. Did I mention we got her from a couple that just bred their two chocolates for the first time? Not experienced breeders or anything, just had a couple of good dogs and they took great care of them and the puppies. For me, black, yellow, chocolate, I love them all.

Breeders must agree to have all test results, positive or negative, published in the CHIC database. A dog need not receive good or even passing scores on the evaluations to obtain a CHIC number, so CHIC registration alone is not proof of soundness or absence of disease, but all test results are posted on the CHIC website and can be accessed by anyone who wants to check the health of a puppy’s parents. If the breeder tells you she doesn’t need to do those tests because she’s never had problems in her lines and her dogs have been “vet checked,” then you should go find a breeder who is more rigorous about genetic testing.

all 3 colours are great and i absolutely love the breed. i know a lot of people with yellow labs and currently i think overall the yellow lab is the most popular. I own a chocolate lab and I’ve had him for almost a year. he has been the absolute best pet anyone would ever wish for, and though i don’t have much knowledge about the yellow or black labs, chocolate labs are my favorite. mine is very playful and really smart. he has been really easy to train and is very cuddly. i definitely recommend chocolate labs.

Generally speaking, Labradors are healthy. They can develop certain inherent conditions, along with cataracts and kneecap displacement, but will remain healthy overall. As long as they are taken to their vet appointments with regularity, Labs will usually feel just fine.

Chocolate Labradors, once considered the “ugly duckling” of the three colors of this retriever breed, are nowadays considered one of the most beautiful. With their endearing personalities and willingness to please, the chocolate Lab, along with the black and yellow Lab, has earned the top spot in the hearts of millions.

My golden English lab is such a sweet heart! Couldn’t live without him!(nor could my beagle) His name is Barney and he is so clever! Everywhere we go people adore him, which I’m not surprised about. He is such a lovely gentle creature who just loves to be around you. He’s a big boy and the perfect guard dog which people are often shocked about. He is a great dog and I advice anyone to get one !

Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.

I have a chocolate lab named Bailey and she is now 18 weeks old. She is VERY intelligent and for her age, very obedient. We had her at the vet not too long ago and there were adult dogs running around, pulling their owners, and being crazy. Bailey at 4 months old either sat or laid there and looked at them. Sure, she would of loved to run around with them but she knew she wasnt allowed.

The Flattie has a high cancer rate and their gene pool is small. Luckily, it’s not something I spend a lot of time thinking about except when I see the proliferation of show Labs in parks here, usually overweight and with shorter legs than the working Labs. Don’t understand why they are more common than the working ones.

Dozer the Labrador Retriever at 3 years old—”Dozer is my best friend, he goes everywhere with me. Some of his favorite places to go are anywhere he can swim, dog park, hiking, the beach, doggy day care, swimming, DockDogs, swimming, and in case I didn’t mention it, swimming. As I just mentioned Dozer and I love competing in DockDogs. His farthest jump is 17ft and we are working on Speed Retrieve. We are also going to start Agility and Flyball classes soon; both of us are super excited about that. Dozer also loves learning new tricks some of his favorites are sit handsomely (that’s where he sits up) circle, How was your day (he will bark saying it’s been real rough), Play dead, hold it (he will hold just about anything in his mouth), and crawl (just to name a few). I love my doggy soul mate.”

At 2 years he has reached or is very near full maturity, so no need to limit activity like you would for a puppy. Therefore, so long as he is fit and healthy, 6 and 8 miles is truly nothing. Labs were bred to be walking, running, swimming and retrieving ALL DAY, over very harsh and rough terrain in the Scottish Highlands. If fit and healthy, he will be able to outperform any human in any physical activity. It’s not too much for him.

Seriously, what’s not to like? Okay, if you want a laid-back lapdog, the Labrador Retriever’s not for you. But a person or family with an active lifestyle would be lucky to invite a Lab into their home.

Max has very good house manners and quickly learned to respect boundaries like the kitchen and front door threshold. He’s not a counter surfer but like most puppies, will steal a fuzzy slipper or shoe if you’re not careful. He enjoys his nylabone and seems to just be learning about how to play with other toys. Right now, he prefers to play by interacting with people, but suspect he will eventually grow into toy play, too. Oh, and the hose¬¬–Max loves to play in hose water!

I have a choc lab puppy of two and a half months old and we brought him home 2 weeks ago. I would have preferred if he is with his mom for a little while more; but owner had many ready buyers and would have sold him anyway.

Do you have any friends with older dogs that have a calm and balanced temperament? That aren’t too boisterous? If so, you could try to organize lots of time for your dog and theirs to spend together. Hopefully this time with other dogs in situations you can more readily control will create a good learning environment where the older dogs let him know how to behave and how to react around other dogs.

I have 2 beautiful blacks labs who are liter mates. Molie Jo is super smart but more submissive to Butter, her brother and Jackson, my border collie/healer mix. Butter is a good 6 inches taller and is mild mannered and talks…a lot. It is not barking…it is like he is seriously talking to you. Is this common for labs? I have seen videos of huskies talking and although I don’t think he is pure bred, he is definitely dominantly lab. Is this talking common?

There’s truth in that, or it wouldn’t be an old saying. Well bred Goldens can (and do) do all the same jobs as Labs, but they seem to take longer to bring along to the same level. That’s one reason Labs are the go-to breed for field trialers and US gov’t. agencies requiring detection dogs & etc..

I grew up with black labs and I am currently owning my 3rd black lab. When I was 2 my 13 year old dog passed away, then we got another the following year. The 1st was named Remy, then we got Roscoe who passed away 2 years ago at 8. Our current dog is Riggs, and he is a 1 and and half old. All the labradors we have owned have been male black labs. I recommend black labradors because of my experience with them, but all lab types are great dogs and extremely loyal.

This breed tends to be very active. They were bred to be working dogs and need exercise. A daily walk and a weekly run should help assuage their energy levels. Yellow Labs also need a fair amount of mental activity as well; they like to stay sharp. Challenging toys and puzzles, plus fun games, will keep your dog’s mind engaged.

The perfect Lab doesn’t spring fully formed from the whelping box. He’s a product of his background and breeding. Whatever you want from a Lab, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

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The Schleich Labrador Retriever Puppy is 1.9 x 0.6 x 1.3 inch (W x D x H). Being that they are water dogs their undercoat is thick to keep water out like a wet suit, while the topcoat is longer hair. This breed even has webbing in between their toes. ***This is a toy***

She is a large dog weighing 60 to 80 pounds and standing 22 to 24 inches tall. She usually has a square shaped head that is flat with a wide square muzzle. Her ears are floppy and hang down and her eyes are oval in shape and usually brown. She most often has a black nose and her coat is usually a double coat, short and thick on top and dense and soft underneath. Length is medium to long and colors range from gold, red, yellows, browns and black.

A symmetrical, powerful, active dog, sound and well put together, not clumsy nor long in the leg, displaying a kindly expression and possessing a personality that is eager, alert and self-confident. Primarily a hunting dog, he should be shown in hard working condition. Overall appearance, balance, gait and purpose to be given more emphasis than any of his component parts. Faults-Any departure from the described ideal shall be considered faulty to the degree to which it interferes with the breed’s purpose or is contrary to breed character.

Hi, my name is Jureshka, and I`m getting a dog, I am not sure which breed is better for small animals, you see I have 10 bunnies and I don’t want my new dog to frighten or kill them, what is the best dog breed for me?

He sounds lovely! You could share photo to our facebook group? With regards to his nervousness around people, it would be best to speak to a professional behaviorist as they will need to discuss things more deeply with you, see the issue first hand and make a proper assessment.

He acclimated relatively quickly to our two senior labs and enjoys his daily walks (restricted due to the heartworm positive treatment) with them. He has good leash manners on a pinch collar and we know he was taught how to sit. He does well in a crate when need be. He takes his meds with a soft mouth, and loves to curl up in his dog bed for an afternoon nap.

There is a reason that year after year, the Labrador Retriever is the most popular dog breed in the United States. The history of the Labrador Retriever dates back to the early 1800’s in Newfoundland, just off the Atlantic coast of Canada. Today’s Lab is a product of the breed being imported to England by the First and Second Dukes of Malmesbury and the 5th and 6th Dukes of Buccleuch as Water Fowl Retrievers. Had these families not played a vital part in the continuation of the breed, the loving and affectionate Labs we have all grown to love may not exist today.

There is no global registry of Labradors, nor is there detailed information on numbers of Labradors living in each country. The countries with the five largest numbers of Labrador registrations as of 2005 are: 1: United Kingdom 2: France and United States (approximately equal), 4: Sweden, 5: Finland.[85][86] Sweden and Finland have far lower populations than the other three countries, suggesting that as of 2005 these two countries have the highest proportion of Labradors per million people: As there is no global registry for Labradors, it is difficult to ascertain whether there is simply a smaller percentage of people formally registering their animals in countries like the United States, or whether the number of animals per capita is actually smaller.

One important note: Labs and goldens are family dogs to their core, and want to spend time with their favorite people. They don’t do well when left to their own devices, and will need a trusted pet sitter or dog walker to help out if you’re not available during the day.

Maria, sounds like you have an active family, which is a bonus with either of these breeds. And each breed has a range of personality types with some members being more sensitive than others. If you take the time to meet at least a handful of Goldens I believe you will be able to find one that will be fine with your family.

^ Jump up to: a b Raffan, Eleanor (May 10, 2016). “A Deletion in the Canine POMC Gene Is Associated with Weight and Appetite in Obesity-Prone Labrador Retriever Dogs”. Cell Metabolism. 23 (5): 893–900. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2016.04.012. PMC 4873617 . PMID 27157046.

I found my angel in a shelter in North Carolina.Isabelle is my best friend.A witty personalty,smart as can be and at 7 tests me every moment she can out of the corner of my eye.I was assaulted,she protects me every moment she can.Always on duty,except if there is a squirrel around!We loveeeeee our Labs!!

Anyway, you basically have to stop him from ever ‘getting away with it’ and eventually the behavior will fade and stop. BUT, if he gets away with it when you aren’t supervising, then it will likely never end. So you have to supervise and intervene. If you cannot supervise, you have to manage the situation and this will probably mean crating, so that he doesn’t get the chance to scratch at doors if you cannot be there to stop it.

Wherever you acquire your Labrador Retriever, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides. Petfinder offers an Adopters Bill of Rights that helps you understand what you can consider normal and appropriate when you get a dog from a shelter.In states with “puppy lemon laws,” be sure you and the person you get the dog from both understand your rights and recourses.

We have a just 6 month old chocolate lab. He is 70+ lbs already. We lost our 12 1/2 yr old black lab last spring. Both dogs have been extremely smart, easy to train and very sociable. The last dog was a therapy dog and this one will be too. He loves people of any age, especially kids.

I have never met a lab or a golden that was a good watch dog. Both are as horrible at it as my cocker spaniel is and are much more likely to approach a stranger with a toy in their mouth than with bared teeth. I have found labs to be far more goofy than goldens. Both breeds have way too much energy for me.

Both breeds are food driven – but make sure you do not over feed them. Both are real real real bad when it comes to being a watch dog. They will probably guide the thief to the treasure as they are very friendly dogs. They love to be around people and love love love attention. They are really great with kids, unless they have a behavior problem or condition. More of the happy-go-lucky types.

I”ve known a lot of labs of indeterminate breeding. They were all “good” dogs, lots of fun, certainly! I’ve really known very few Goldens, now that I think about it. When I first met him and we were just boyfriend-girlfriend, my fiance had a chocolate lab-golden retriever mix; she was a very pretty dog, very sweet and surprisingly calm.

The Goldador is one of the few designer breeds with a fairly predictable size, as both parent breeds are large and similar in size and shape. The Goldador is usually 22 to 24 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 60 to 80 pounds.

Hello all you lab lobers (yea that was a pirate pun lol). I have 3 chocolate labs and each is so different than the other. My boy is very strong, energetic and easy to train (I think hes more of an American or field lab). I have trained him to do tricks like turning around in a circle and rolling over and a few others. He is not as people loving as the other two as he would rather be chasing lizards but he is always down for a good hug and belly rub. My first female is the youngest of the three and has this diva thing going on. You can call her all day long and she will come when she wants to. She has not been easy to train but because she is mellow and very calm we let her be with just basic commands such as sit, no, etc. Our oldest is very people oriented and loves to make folks happy. She can fetch all day or lay by your feet if its what you want. All in all I believe each dog has it’s own personality and I believe all are intelligent. Some are just lazy and probably toy with us like cats do lol. In conclusion, I enjoy that they are each different because it means there is never a dull moment or cold feet around 😀

Shedding: Both the Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever shed moderately. Shedding is a normal process to naturally lose old or damaged hair. Brushing will reduce shedding as well as make the coats softer and cleaner.

Hello I’m Tammy, I wanted to ask about their dry skin in the winter, for I just got married to my husband that has Marley, Marley is a chocolate lad his is 6 years old. I have to say Marley is a very smart, sweet, great dog all around and Marley and I had no problems excepting each other. I just wish I could help him with the itching of dry skin. Thank you

I raise and show Labradors so this caught my eye. I have numerous Lab statues but have never seen one of an old Labrador … and the old dogs are so special to me. It is so life-like, has that sweet old-dog expression … exceeded my expectations! Love her!

Greenfield Puppies has been finding loving homes for puppies for over a decade. Breeders on our site are located throughout Pennsylvania and surrounding states. We expect every breeder to comply with all state laws and follow strict guidelines that we have put in place. We do not condone any puppy mills and strive to bring you only the best, well-loved puppies. We expect all Dog Breeders to guarantee the health of their puppies in accordance with their states laws and guidelines. If you are looking for puppies for sale in PA, look no further.

Labrador Retriever- It will not be wrong to say that Labrador retriever is one of the most loved breeds around the world. These are easily trainable and makes a perfect family dog.For more information go through  Page on www.dogspot.in

Jen, I once fell in love with a Doberman – Dreamer – and if I hadn’t been helping place him in a home with a disabled person who needed him (as opposed to my just wanting him) I could have easily been a Doberman person for at least Dreamer’s lifetime.

She is an intelligent dog who loves to please, loves mental challenges as well as physical and is devoted to her owner. This makes her one of the easier dogs to train and in fact she should learn faster than many dogs as she will not needs as many repetitions of each step. Just be sure to use positive methods not harsh. Praise her, reward her with play, outings, treats. Even though she is naturally a great dog already still start early socialization and training from the moment you get her. She will be happier and you will too.

I have therefore had to spend a bit more time ‘proofing’ basic obedience than I would with one of my yellow or black working bred labs.   And I have to make a special effort to ensure that she is not allowed to interact with visitors until she is sitting calmly.

Also, Is this happening when you are home? Only when you are out and he is home alone? If you are home, you need to catch him in the act, intervene with a firm ‘no’ and give him something better to do instead, like a favorite chew toy. DO NOT scold him afterwards, only if you catch him in the act. If after, he will not have a clue what you are angry about, the moment has passed and he will just think you’re unreasonable and it can damage your relationship.

The Newfoundland dog during the days of the St. John’s dog was not the contemporary breed as we recognize it. The Newfoundland is a distinctly Canadian breed and yet even today, the Newfoundland in Canada remains true to its origins and only comes in two colors, Black, and Landseer, neither of which is dilute. The dilute allele was likely introduced into the Canadian Newfoundland after it was exported to Europe and crossed with mastiff breeds after the Labrador was already established as an individual breed. Since the first Chesapeake Bay Retriever ( a bitch) was imported to Great Britain by Dr. Helen Inglesby in the 1930’s, this is also evidence debunking the claim that the Labrador was developed by crossing the Newfoundland with the Chesapeake Bay Retriever, and is patently not accurate.

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We have an almost 8 yr old chocolate. She is the sweetest dog ever. Her owners only let the litter nurse once during the night and we got her at less than four weeks old. A better fate with us. She loves about 12 people and is scarred of anyone unknown. She remembers everyone she’s ever encounter no matter the time between visits. Lack of intelligence, no way. She remembers who has been mean to her or unfortunately the wonderful vet we’ve used for over 20 years who spade her at six months, is on her “you hurt me list”. She was house trained at 9 weeks, follows all the commands I have taught her and learned them quickly. She has wonderful manners with those she loves. She stays by my husband’s side who is retired and makes sure she knows he’s ok. The vet says not enough nursing by her mother caused a social retardation. Very sad for her as so many miss out on the sweet loving dog she is. But she’ll be with us forever. Loving kind smart and protective, and like the lab is always eager to please. Now her “sister” the Weimaraner, smart and does what she’s told if she wants too.

I would love to find a true golden lab cross, but here in CT I haven’t been able to find a breeder. We rescued our last two pups (both yellow lab mixes) and they were both excellent family dogs. Our last lab, Remington, looked like a lab, but was soft like a golden . . . he had a beautiful build with longer legs, big chest . . . he could hold his weight. In the end he was 100 lbs, but looked like a puppy still at 11-1/2! His coat was soooooo soft, so he may have had some golden in him! I miss them both dearly. I’m keeping my eye out for another yellow lab mix . . . I’m hoping we stumble upon another “soft” one.

If you have older dogs or children, the puppy may well try to keep up with them and over-exert themselves, playing to exhaustion and damage their developing joints. So keep an eye on them and interrupt play if need be, to give them plenty of rest.

Sugar was born in April of 2012 to Luke and Marley, an off-Ranch Golden/Yellow dam from North Scottsdale. She has a smooth, uniform short coat and is tall, leggy, and lanky, with a vivid white blaze. With her soulful puppy eyes, she lives up to her name as a real sweetheart. She plays nicely for hours on end with all the older girls, and mastered our swimming pool at three months of age. She was an easy pup to train, seldom getting into any mischief, and quickly learning to ring the hanging “jingle bells” when she needs to go outside. Sugar exhibits amazing speed and agility, making her quite the scourge of small rodents and lizards as she sprints around the ranch property. Indoors, though, she’s a calm, loving snuggle-buddy, just like her dad and grand-dad.

It sounds like you have a very loving home to offer a dog. I would suggest considering adopting an adult Golden if you decide to go that route – the puppies can be very energetic and need to learn not to jump up on people – they tend to be very excited to see the ones they love. Plus, an adult often comes already house trained, one of my favorite features 🙂

Contrary to popular belief, small size doesn’t necessarily an apartment dog make — plenty of small dogs are too high-energy and yappy for life in a high-rise. Being quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents, are all good qualities in an apartment dog.

Have owned a chocolate lab female. Also a dog I believe was a Golden. Loved them both. The lab lived to hunt.Even if her feet were sore. Was a very sweet girl. She did prefer one person but was good to everyone. The Golden was shepard colored and beautiful. He never met anyone he didnt like, only wanted petted. As far as personality I did like the Golden a little better. He had the best smile. Very mild mannered.

Now that we’ve clarified that, let’s add silver and fox red (or Ruby) Labrador Retrievers to the mix. The D gene in its recessive dd combination can mute the coloration of a Labrador, resulting in a gray or silver-colored coat.

Anyway, I did a lot of reading before writing the article above and the truth of the matter is, nobody really knows if too much exercise will ‘definitely’ do damage, but it’s a safe bet that not giving too much definitely will not. So, it’s probably not worth the risk and better to be safe than sorry?

Every dog breed has their own unique characteristics. Sometimes that can make them difficult to identify. Many of our customers are shopping for the dog lover in their life. Matching dog gifts to the real life breed can be tricky. Compare these real life Black Labradors to the dog you are shopping for so you know you have the right breed!

I would hazard a guess that the shorter labs are more common where you are as they were developed in England, while the taller field dogs were developed largely in the U.S. – you can find both around the world but I’ve noticed there are more field Labs in the Midwest U.S.(and thus it doesn’t surprise me that you see more bench Labs in your parks.)

I just aquired a chocolate lab puppy. I’ve had her a week and a half. Brandy is 9.5 weeks old and very self aware. She sleeps 6 or 7 hours regularly. She lets me know when she has to go out. She has almost completely quit biting my hands. (Now we are working on clothes and other off limits items) She watches tv. Actually follows the figures on the screen with her gaze.

Puppies have soft bone areas called growth plates in their legs, where the bone grows from. Until they harden and are described as ‘closed’, they can easily be injured resulting in stunted or irregular growth. The most likely way to injure them is by continued repetitive movement such as by jogging (especially on hard surfaces), or hard impacts or twisting from, for instance, jumps and hard landings.

Incontinence is also common in old Labs, especially spayed females. However, some forms of incontinence can be treated with medication. Giving both you and your senior Labrador improved quality of life.

I have a 1 1/2 yellow female that is a very tall and big (72 lbs) yet lean machine. We live in Vermont and while I had a difficult time dealing with the cold weather this winter Abby thrived in it. I took her on a 5 mile hike in April where she did her “dolphin swim” in the snow for most of it. With that said, the temperatures are approaching the 80’s and Abby cannot seem to handle the heat. Even when on a slow and short walk she turns around with her leash in her mouth and is telling me that she wants to go home. When we get back into the house she pants excessively and breaths heavy for at lead 15 minutes. I realize that taking her swimming is her best form of exercise in the heat but it also means 1 hour round trip of driving for me and at the most I can only fit that in 3 days a week. Two questions: 1) Should I be concerned about her lack of tolerance for the heat considering her age and lean body make up and 2) What should I do with Abby on the days that I can not give her enough real exercise? We do walk 1 1/2 miles in the morning and 1/2 mile at night with very sort walks in-between …is that enough exercise for her?

Some breeds bond very closely with their family and are more prone to worry or even panic when left alone by their owner. An anxious dog can be very destructive, barking, whining, chewing, and otherwise causing mayhem. These breeds do best when a family member is home during the day or if you can take the dog to work.

The color of your adult chocolate Labrador Retriever boy or girl’s coat will however vary depending on whether the coat is newly grown after a moult, or is about to shed. You can read more about shedding here: Shedding Labradors

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Labs consider the place they sleep or rest as sort of a den. Even as a puppy without any training, this instinct was very apparent. So the only reason for your lab’s behaviour must be the helplessness and you can definitely retrain! Poor thing! Why do people have dogs if they can’t take care of them!? 🙁

A Labrador is a loyal and intelligent dog that was initially bred to retrieve waterfowl. A Golden Retriever was bred initially as a gundog. They look similar. They both have thick, dense, water-repellent coats, and are great working dogs. 

A favourite disability assistance breed in many countries, Labradors are frequently trained to aid the blind, those who have autism, to act as a therapy dog, or to perform screening and detection work for law enforcement and other official agencies.[9] Additionally, they are prized as sporting and hunting dogs.[11]

Labradors are a very ‘mouthy’ breed as they were designed for retrieving, to carry things in their mouths. It’s what they are born to do. So not only is it in most dogs nature to chew, but Labradors can be the worst!

The life expectancy for Labrador Retrievers is generally 10-12 years. They have relatively few health problems, but are prone to hip and elbow dysplasia, ear infections and eye disorders. Labs that are fed too much and exercised too little may develop obesity problems. It’s very important that they get daily exercise along with moderate rations of food.

(Please keep in mind we are all volunteers, most of us work full time and we all have personal lives. I do call everyone back within 2-3 days so please be patient and I will be back in touch with you. When the dogs are in foster homes then it may take longer as we need to touch base with the fosters for updates on the dogs. We work very hard to make the right matches for the dogs and for the new owners. We get 3-5 dogs per week and we do not have a facility that we keep the dogs housed in. They are scattered all over the Bay Area.)

There seems to be quite a range in prices for the Golden Labrador starting at $500 and going up to $1800. You should let the trustworthiness if the breeder and the health of the puppy be the guiding factor more than how much it costs. You will need to also spend about $230 on medical tests, collar and leash, a crate, spaying and a micro chip. Ongoing medical costs each year will be $485 to $600 to cover pet insurance, vet check ups, vaccinations and so on. Ongoing non-medical costs each year will be $500 to $650 covering things like food, a license, training, treats and toys.

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Our retired guide dog is a 19 yr old black Labrador retriever, although well trained she is now pooping and peeing in the house. We tried all the usual things but nothing works. The vets also say there is nothing left for them to do. She has outlived all her litter mates by eight years.

Providing enough exercise and mental stimulation. Labrador Retrievers were developed to be hunting dogs. They are athletic dogs who need regular opportunities to vent their energy and do interesting things. Otherwise they will become bored, which they may express by becoming rambunctious and destructive.

Labrador Retrievers are one of the most recognizable breeds of dogs. Even people who aren’t dog lovers can recognize a Lab! They make great therapy dogs, service dogs and guide dogs, gun dogs retrieving upland game and fowl, search and rescue dogs, and are the best all-around family dog. Their health problems are similar to most large dogs. They are susceptible to hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia and progressive retinal atrophy. Diabetes can also be a serious problem if your Lab suffers from obesity.

His intelligence and desire to please render him highly trainable, and he responds best to positive reinforcement techniques. He’s capable of working and thinking independently – and does so beautifully as an assistance dog – but he prefers to have guidance and structure in his life. This is a people-loving dog who won’t be happy left to himself in the backyard.

Labrador retrievers, according to the Dog Breed Info website, are one of the most popular breeds of dog in the United States. Intelligent canines, Labrador retrievers are known to posses loyal, loving, willing and affectionate temperaments. This dog breed consists of three different groups, one of which is the black Labrador.

She can be left in the house alone, completely potty trained – but will sit on furniture if allowed, to look out the window. She does not dig and in over two weeks we have not heard her bark…not even alarm bark. She is fine in a secure back yard, and while she explores, she does not try to escape. She is unfazed by cats but is mesmerized by birds. And Bella should be in a ONE DOG family. She’s wonderful with children and a fabulous family dog.

We have a eight year old female lab, she is beautiful, gentle, greedy, stubborn and smart when she wants to be. We had a golden male lab years ago he was put down when he was almost thirteen due to cancer. Our lab still thinks she is a puppy, our friends and people l meet on the street cannot believe she is eight as she is such a baby. She always makes me smile.

I’ve had black labs all my life, and I can honestly say they have all been trainable, loyal and friendly to everyone. I have never owned a golden but have met 7 in my life, all have been nasty dogs! Growly, standoffish, I witnessed one bite a child (apparently it had done it before) and even after reprimanded didn’t seem to care what it done was wrong. Whereas if any of my labs had done something similar they would have been sulking and evidently regretful. I personally would never own or trust a golden based on my experiences!

In my family, we have always owned labs, not only because we are a family who hunts, but also because we value loyalty, friendship, and compassion. My first lab was Jessie. She was an amazing beauty on and off the dove field. She was one of the best retrievers I have ever witnessed. My dad’s friends were jealous of his dog when they went hunting with him. My dad can count 3 times when she didn’t find the bird that he had shot. At home, she was gentle and calm. She only got into trouble once, and after that she never chewed another shoe. She rarely barked and always wagged her tail. Writing this makes me sad, she was such a good friend of mine. I knew her like a sister, honestly. My lab now is Tut. He is a beast on the dove field, but don’t let my adjective deceive you, he is a small, agile lab. The thing about Tut that makes me love him so much is that he has a connection with our family. When my parents got divorced, it sent him into months of depression. I knew that this divorce broke his heart, as it did all of us. I can’t imagine living a life where my Tutty isn’t happily waiting at home for me everyday. I know very many Goldens and they are beautiful, great dogs, but I can’t say that I’ve ever seen them connect with their owners as labs do. Of course they love their owners and their owners love them, but it seems as if that is the extent of the relationship. With labs, it goes much deeper. Goldens seem like they are simply a pet, but a lab is a brother or a sister.

He can’t walk on a leash, he doesnt react when we call him if anyone is around, he doesnt like ball games and doesnt want to swim. Really happy though, loves everyone and everything around him. He know alot of tricks though and he knows it all but when something more fun comes, there is no reason to listen to his owners.

We have a Beautiful intelligent 1 year old chocolate Labrador “Brontė” she would be a fantastic helper dog, as she is well behaved, gentle and so willing to please!! She has brought so much love & laughter into our family! Chocolate Labradors are fantastic Xxx

I have “owned” both breeds. Had one perfect Golden for over 12 years, then 2 more before we went dogless for a couple years. Fell in love with a big black Lab pup who became part of our hearts and started to turn us into Lab fanatics. Love the kindly Goldens, but found they tend to get fat more easily, and the long hair is harder to keep looking good. I now have 3 Labs – one of each color, ages 9, 3 and 2. Grooming is a cinch and I disagree with the shedding statement…..maybe it’s a question of diet or grooming but it’s not a great problem for us, even with 3 dogs. The yellow male definitely does shed more than our black or chocolate. The Labs are indeed, less likely to get their feelings hurt, and tolerate chaos when the grandchildren or other visitors bring their dogs. And, because they’ve always had lots of freedom with daily outings off lead, they will not let me out of their sight when in the woods or fields. They run and chase but if I turn back one step, they are immediately at my side. Once a Lab is bonded to you, their faithfulness is legendary. Each breed….Goldens, German Shepherds or Labs are each wonderful, but the easy to train, easy to care for, stable Lab will always be the breed for me!

Labrador Retrievers are registered in three colours:[26] black (a solid black colour), yellow (considered from cream to fox-red), and chocolate (medium to dark brown). Some dogs are sold as silver pure-bred Labradors, but purity of those bloodlines is currently disputed by breed experts including breed clubs and breed councils.[30][31] Some major kennel clubs around the world allow silver Labradors to be registered, but not as silver. The Kennel Club (England) requires that they be registered as “Non-recognised.”[32] Occasionally, Labradors will exhibit small amounts of white fur on their chest, paws, or tail, and rarely a purebred Lab will exhibit brindling stripes or tan points similar to a Rottweiler.[33] These markings are a disqualification for show dogs but do not have any bearing on the dog’s temperament or ability to be a good working or pet dog.

Poor oral hygiene is linked to a myriad of health issues on dogs. Here are five ways neglecting your dog’s oral hygiene can negatively impact not only her teeth and gums, but also her overall health and well-being.

The Labrador Retriever Guide is not intended to replace the advice of a Veterinarian or other pet Professional. This site accepts advertising and other forms of compensation for products mentioned. Such compensation does not influence the information or recommendations made. We always give our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experiences. © 2018 Labrador-Retriever-Guide.com.

As large dogs, both the Golden Retriever and theLabrador Retriever have very similar growth patterns. By the end of the first year, both dog breeds will be nearly 2 feet at the withers. Growth requires proper nutrition and these dog breeds will need approximately 2.5 to 3 cups of dry dog food daily.

We took him in and introduced him to Pudd’n, a young, head strong and stubborn Swiss Mountain Dog. The contrast is amazing! Hershey, who we believe is about 6 now (although previous owners weren’t exactly sure what year they got him!) is the older of the two, but, while not subservient to Pudd, will generally let him have his way when it comes to rough housing, or collecting treats. Good thing too, both top out at approximately 125 to 140 pds!

My chocolate lab, Kooky is coming up on 2 years old. She’s wonderful, full of energy, obedient , great with other dogs and children. I’ve never known a dog be so tactile, she leans against me with her full weight and lies on my feet to snooze. What would I do without her ???

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Labradors are well known for their rather excessive shedding tendencies. Yellow Labs shed just like their chocolate or black cousins, although it does tend to show up less on my carpets as the hairs are pale instead of dark.

I wouldn’t say it’s a common thing, but nearly every dog I’ve had – regardless of breed – I’ve been able to make or have heard howl at something at some point. Put on a youtube video of other dogs or wolves howling, maybe a car alarm, or a repetitive siren, even Celine Dion warbling on the radio, that sort of thing 🙂

“Nala Chanelle is a Golden Labrador Retriever from Puerto Rico, shown here as a 2-month-old puppy. She has lovely blue eyes and a killer smooth golden tone on her fur (not yellow). Nala is very playful but also very demanding (Top Dog trait? hehehe). She has already seen her vet for general checkup and parasite deworming at 1 month. (She only had 2 young eggs, medicine was administered and on 2nd visit (6 weeks), she was all clear). That 1-month general health assessment went great! Doctor found her in super great shape and her 6-week-old first vaccination went very well also. She was fed on Royal Canin Puppy 33 up until now. She just started Pedigree Puppy. This transition helped her well. She favors tennis balls, a teething rope with two plastic balls, and a teething plastic lifesaver as her toys, but also likes to call for attention and be petted and played with. (She shows a very happy tail and active jumping/running with human playful interaction). We started the “Sit” and “Down” commands yesterday with the information on your page and we were amazed!!!! (For now, I showed her I am Top Dog and she behaved better!!! This is incredible and powerful stuff!!! hahaha). Loud barking and calling for attention are still issues at hand, but we will not be disappointed easily and we will keep training and interacting in a more knowledgeable and effective way each time.”

Labs are more hearty and workers than goldens. Search Google images for a diagram of golden retrievers in different mental states: happy, sad, miserable, dejected, overjoyed, disappointed, grief-struck, etc.

He is a stressed dog and some would say untrained. We have spent alot of money and time to make him better and the hard work has paid off. He was terrible and I just though the only thing we could do was to give him up. Today he is much better and I would never even think about giving him up.

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One thing that is especially important to keep in mind is that this breed has a tendency to retain weight if it is sedentary too often, or if it is given too many treats. One of the most common health problems for the modern Labrador dog is obesity. A healthy Labrador should have a trim, hourglass shape. While it may be tempting to treat your Lab pal often, in return for their unconditional affection, it is far better to treat your friend with quality playtime rather than edible treats. This will ensure that you and your Lab will enjoy a long and healthy companionship. Labradors do very well outside with a doghouse, as they are adaptable for outdoor conditions, but they prefer to live indoors, close to people, most of the time.

Regardless of the brand of food she is on, if she’s gaining weight you should cut back on the portion sizes. Extra weight is definitely not doing her any favors. You can be fairly sure cutting down on her food intake will do no harm because if she’s gaining weight, she must be consuming excess calories and the only way to stop that is to cut down on the food she eats or add in more exercise, likely a little of both. Feeding her less will be harder on you than it is on her. She will be fine eating less, but will likely give you those puppy eyes every time there’s anything remotely edible in view. Just don’t give in!

Labradors are powerful and indefatigable swimmers noted for their ability to tolerate the coldest of water for extended periods of time. Their ability to work quietly alongside hunters while watching for birds to fall from the sky, marking where they land, and then using their outstanding nose to find and retrieve dead or wounded birds has made them the king of waterfowl retrievers.[55] They are also used for pointing and flushing and make excellent upland game hunting partners.[56]

Hi Susan, for arthritis G5 is MAGIC and art phyton (plant-based product) too. My yellow one couldn’t walk anymore at the age of 5. We give it a table spoon of the G5 liquid every day until the rest of her life. She lived happily until the age of 15.5. She was just wonderful and i missed her every day. I have a chocolate now. She is 17 month old. She is clever, playful, a bit stubborn like all labra but so sweet and definitely a great swimmer. Labra best dog ever!

It’s great that you’re maintaining such a good level of activity for him, it will maintain muscular strength, keep joints moving and help keep his mind and attitude stay youthful too! Exercise is very important for older dogs.

He never seems to tire sounds about right! Labs are athletic machines! In my life I’ve had three, also a lurcher-terrier cross, a lab-collie mix and so on, every single one of my dogs could go on and on, far longer than I could and never seemed to tire. Maybe I should work on my fitness? haha.

Considering that the Labrador Retriever is the most popular dog breed in the United States, it’s no surprise that many of us have a Labrador lover on our shopping lists this holiday season. And that’s perfect, because there’s a wide variety of fun Labrador Retriever-themed products out there.

The Labrador should be short-coupled, with good spring of ribs tapering to a moderately wide chest. The Labrador should not be narrow chested; giving the appearance of hollowness between the front legs, nor should it have a wide spreading, bulldog-like front. Correct chest conformation will result in tapering between the front legs that allows unrestricted forelimb movement. Chest breadth that is either too wide or too narrow for efficient movement and stamina is incorrect. Slab-sided individuals are not typical of the breed; equally objectionable are rotund or barrel chested specimens. The underline is almost straight, with little or no tuck-up in mature animals. Loins should be short, wide and strong; extending to well developed, powerful hindquarters. When viewed from the side, the Labrador Retriever shows a well-developed, but not exaggerated forechest.

Lil just doesn’t get my concept of wrong at all; she gives me a hurt look when I hold up a torn up item and loudly proclaim, “What bad dog did this?” But then she wags her tail, runs over and looks around like, “hey that was me! I’ll do it again, just watch.”

Labs are smart and highly trainable, but they don’t just magically turn into great dogs. Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, countersurfing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Lab, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is about three years old. 

Anyway, you basically have to stop him from ever ‘getting away with it’ and eventually the behavior will fade stop. BUT, if he gets away with it when you aren’t supervising, then it will likely never end. So you have to supervise and intervene. If you cannot supervise, you have to manage the situation and this will probably mean crating, so that he doesn’t get the chance to scratch at doors if you cannot be there to stop it.

Background: Jasper recently moved to northern California from Michigan. He came for the sunshine, eclectic cuisine, diverse culture, and liberal attitudes… but he stayed for the walks and bones and belly rubs. Regrettably his human caretaker must move into an apartment and only one dog is allowed. Jasper’s roomie Marty won the coin toss for the apartment.

We also provide a sophisticated search engine to show you the best results for whatever you are searching for. Not just good photos that happen to use the words you searched on, but actually great photos, sorted to first show the best, most relevant, inspirational, motivational and powerful pictures that other people like you have purchased in the past. And, as you know, that really helps when you’re short on time!

There is a ‘long hair gene’ in the labrador gene pool but it’s not common. I have to admit I’ve rarely if ever seen them! There is a breed called the ‘flat-coated retriever‘ and sometimes the ‘wavy-coated retriever’ that look VERY similar to the labrador and certainly share some close ancestry.

The ‘5-minutes per month of life’ is a generalization that is a good guide, but all dogs are different so it will not suit all dogs. And in your situation, if your Lab has been receiving 1.5hrs, he will have gotten used to that and now expect it as his body is primed for it. So on the days he doesn’t get that much, he will have excess energy. Using the rule for a 7 month old would be 35 minutes of structured exercise. Stuff like running, jogging, playing fetch and so on.

What the shelter said about Teddy: Teddy was found by a person who was out taking a walk on a country road near Mendocino. He was found with an unneutered Great Dane who was not in the best shape. We feel he must be a loved pet as he is in good shape and knows sit, shake and down! He rides well in the car, loves all people and dogs. He was quiet in his kennel run at the shelter with barking dogs and people cleaning around him.

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Vigorous and high impact exercise if I was carrying that extra weight could cause damage to my joints and bones. It’s the same for our dogs. So running, jumping and so on with all that extra weight could cause other problems.

You can check with your vet who by way of x-ray can tell you when your puppy’s plates have closed, or after one x-ray be better placed to give an approximate time when they’re expected to close and when you’ll be able to begin running together.

A gene has two alleles, one from each parent, that are paired to create a genotype. This distinguishes a phenotype. Together, this means the genetic coding expresses a physical or behavioral trait. These alleles are usually designated by a capital letter, the dominant trait, and a lowercase letter, the recessive trait.

Finally, please understand it is totally normal. Some puppies are worse than others, but all do it. It’s a few months of patience and dedication to teaching them right from wrong, followed by a decade (hopefully more) of pure joy from the best and most loving family member you can ask for. So stick in there…it will be worth it! But you do have to put in some work, along the lines of what’s described above, or some other logical advice. Just put the work in for a few weeks / months, and I know I keep repeating myself, but IT WILL all be worth it 🙂

Fairly normal behavior….except for the ignoring you to play with others bit! At 2 months old though your puppy should only be leaving his / her mother this week and if was taken away earlier, quite likely missed out on some important bite inhibition training from their mother and siblings.

YELLOW: Yellow Labradors can range in shade from a very light cream all the way to a fox red color with various darker shading along the ears, top line, tail and hocks. A small white spot on the chest is permissible, however will not be noticeable in the lighter shades of yellow. Yellow Labradors should have black pigment on the nose, lips and eye rims with the exception of newborn yellow as they are born without pigment but within the first few days of life, the black pigment will begin to come in. Some yellows because of the chocolate gene factor may have no black pigment. Although this is not for the show ring, as a wonderful pet puppy it just does not matter. This puppy is called a “Dudley.” The black pigment on the nose of a Labrador can fade in the winter to a brown or pink color. This is referred to as “snow nose.” This is different than “no black pigment” and returns when the weather warms.

There’s no quick, simple and easy fix. You have to follow a positive, progressive, ongoing training plan. Giving your Lab lots of attention and affection, working with them – not commanding them – and making them feel good about working with you, and rewarded for working with you. You have to be a friend and leader, not just a leader, and you have to be a rewarding leader, so your Lab decides and chooses to listen to you, because over time you’ve made that a brilliant and rewarding thing for them to do.

Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference-the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.

Finally, you can avoid some negative traits by training your Labrador Retriever to respect you and by following the 11-step care program in my book, 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy.

Bella is the sweetest, most affectionate dog! She is driven to please her family, and an incredibly fast learner. In a few short days she learned to sit (on command, with or without treats), knows lie “down”, understands “on your bed” and will play catch (and fetch!) all day long. She will go potty, on command and with prodding will sit (not patiently, tail is wagging like mad!) for her meals. She loves warm baths and thinks the blow dryer is a fabulous thing. Bella likes to be on her and she has a favorite toy that if you say, “where is your baby?” She will search high and low to find it. When you say, “bed time” she picks up her baby and goes upstairs to her bed. Bella has a nickname, Shadow, as she likes to be where the family is.

What Max’s foster says: Max is an owner surrender from the Santa Cruz shelter and appears to be a very well bred English Labrador. He is not very tall but has those adorable thick English features we love: a big blocky head, wiggly otter tail, massive paws, luxuriously silky coat and a joyful labby smile full of sparkling white teeth. He’s still very much a big puppy who’s just starting to settle into a daily routine.

The Black Labrador is a family dog known for their sweet-hearted nature that will melt any Lab lover’s heart. They are great with kids and stay loyal to the family. This breed’s jet black coat makes the Black Labrador easily identifiable. All of our Black Labrador Retriever gifts, collectibles, & other stuff, show off the breed’s dark-as-night coat. Being solid black, our outdoor garden figures are great outdoor decor items to deter birds and other pesky creatures who may lurk into your yard. Our Indoor Black Labrador gifts are a great way to decorate your home decor. From our cozy Black Labrador socks to our “House is Not a Home Signs” and Black Lab statues, you are sure to find the right gifts for Black Lab lovers! Many items in our selection of Black Labrador merchandise are in the shape of a Lab silhouette, which welcomes you to buy these products for Chocolate and Yellow Labrador lovers too! If you are looking for our Chocolate or Yellow lab decor collection, visit the links below.

The Labrador’s ancestors originated on the island of Newfoundland, now part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador in Canada. I heard no mention of the Lab pulling in fishing nets in Newfoundland. They were named after the Labrador Sea off Newfoundland. If you ever go to St John’s, Newfoundland you will see statutes of the Lab everywhere. That is why Labs love the water. They were bred to help fishermen pull in their fishing nets. The British came to the colonies and loved this dog took it back to England and that is where it became a hunting dog while the Americans came and took it back to breed then taller and thinner. This is an important part of the history of the Lab that was never mentioned above.

Also, too much fetch with a puppy can kind of kill their fetching drive. You should mix things up by playing fetch, then tug, then a short burst of a few training commands, a little jog…be random, and exciting.

He really is a hidden gem: he is gangly—-all legs— and wiggles all over when he wants to eat or go out on a walk. His bark/bay is hilarious: every squirrel or cat or chicken will know he is around!!

The tail and coat are designated “distinctive [or distinguishing] features” of the Labrador by both the Kennel Club and AKC.[26][28] The AKC adds that “true Labrador Retriever temperament is as much a hallmark of the breed as the ‘otter’ tail.”[26]

A symmetrical, powerful, active dog, sound and well put together, not clumsy nor long in the leg, displaying a kindly expression and possessing a personality that is eager, alert and self-confident. Primarily a hunting dog, he should be shown in hard working condition. Overall appearance, balance, gait and purpose to be given more emphasis than any of his component parts. Faults-Any departure from the described ideal shall be considered faulty to the degree to which it interferes with the breed’s purpose or is contrary to breed character.

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My husband and I have had our chocolate lab for three months now. I have never had a dog before. She was a rescue dog, so we don’t know a lot about her. We took Brandy to obedience classes, and she did very well. She can be very stubborn though. I walk her three times a day, and we practice the things we learned at obedience classes. She watches tv as well, loves animal programs, loves being aroubd people. I work at home, so am able to have her at work with me. Oh supposedly she is a lab-pointer cross, is about 16 months old, has an abundance of energy, eats all of her toys. I make treats for her, and she loves them.

Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality.

My Chocolate Lab, Caesar, is coming up 5 in January. The first 18 months were tiresome but looking back now fun. Now he is just the amazing obedient dog who loves everyone and knows everyday will not be the same ( I work in aviation ) as I continually head OS for work for up to five days . The day I leave he won’t even take a treat. Just sulk. Then on my return goes insane and won’t let me out of his sight. While I am away my other half face times me and Caesar watches and knows it’s me. He has always loved television and knows when his shows come on. He fetches most household things on command and has a grand knowledge of our conversations. As I am sure with everyone’s dogs they are almost human in a way. Also April this year I had a stroke in my garage , fell and smashed my head. Car door was open and he jumped in and blasted the horn till my partner woke up !! I must admit the first two years I was worried. It was a 24/7 job ( had lots of time of work ) he needed constant supervision and love. Now it’s paid back ten fold and the house is his 🙂 nothing dumb about chocolate Labradors. Maybe that selective deafness sometimes 🙂

I have 1 9Yr old Golden whom I just adore and 2 labs 1 7mths 1 is 3mths. My golden is and was calmier than the labs and keeps up well but is so well mannered niw maybe bc he is a senior now and these 2 are pups but i dont prefer any one of the other. I adore both breeds and enjoy every moment I am lucky to spend with my guys..

Medical Information: Neutered, microchipped, up to date on vaccinations and heartworm negative. Like many seniors, Spencer takes daily medication to address some stiffness in his hips. His hearing may be impaired.

Our family is dedicated to Flat Coats, but I have lived with Goldens and known many labs. In addition, at the dog park, I have met many Goldens and Labs. The three breeds are more alike than unalike, but I think there is, on average, a difference. In terms of “people oriented” I would rank then Flat Coat>Golden>Lab, although the Goldens are very close to the Flat Coats in this respect. At the dog park, the Goldens regularly come by to greet other dog owners and give them a hug, this is much less common in the Labs, who are more “other dog” oriented. On the other hand, from what I can tell, the Labs may be the smartest of the three breeds. I have not lived with a Lab, but the Goldens shed more than our Flatties (although our current dog sheds much less than our last one). Goldens shed a LOT! But then again, that fur is what makes them so huggable. Another minor factor is that as Labs get old, their fur turns coarse and not very pleasant to pet–this does not occur nearly as much in the Flatties and Goldens. I have heard of Golden/Flattie crossbreeds in England, where I guess they are a popular guide dog (in this roll, they are often attacked by bull breeds according to one research report), but not seen any of these in the US.

  Fergus (1997-2011), founded our breedline. At a strapping 98 pounds (none of it fat), 27″ at the shoulder, with a block head and fox-red coloring, Fergus was a “leg-leaner” who loved attention. Born to pedigreed parents in Massachusetts, he was with us all his life, and travelled cross-country in our RV nine times.

Chocolates: Shades ranging from light sedge to chocolate. A small white spot on chest is permissible. Eyes to be light brown to clear yellow. Nose and eye rim pigmentation dark brown or liver colored. ‘Fading’ to pink in winter weather not serious.

Start training early; be patient and be consistent and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog. Even so, there are a couple of Lab behaviors that you should expect to live with throughout his life. They are part and parcel of being a Lab, and nothing you do will change them. Labs are active, Labs love to get wet, and Labs love to eat.

All of those characteristics make the Labrador well-suited to a variety of active families. He’s perfect for homes with rowdy older children, but may be a little rambunctious around toddlers, especially as a puppy or young dog. Singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed, and his size and even temperament make the Labrador a great companion for active seniors who love to walk and would appreciate a dog who looks intimidating, even if he is more of a lover than a fighter.

Heidi (born 2004) is 75 pounds, 24″, ruggedly built with a blocky head, and obviously favors her Lab side. A first-generation mix born to pedigreed parents in North Phoenix, she is extremely bright (she opens sliding doors!), goal-oriented, and is an enthusiastic swimmer and diver, actually snorkeling after toys. Heidi produces a typical litter of eleven playful, lively, medium-large pups, and has assumed the role of conscientious nanny to everyone else’s litters.

Labrador retriever. THIS IS A PRECISION CUT DECAL, THERE IS NO BACKGROUND OR CLEAR BACKING, THE BACKGROUND WILL BE THE SURFACE THAT THE DECAL IS APPLIED TO. THIS IS AN ADHESIVE DECAL. THIS DECAL WILL STICK TO JUST ABOUT ANY SMOOTH, DRY, NON-POROUS SURFACE.