“The best gift I’ve ever received as a dog lover was from my mom, for my oldest dog Buster who’s currently 14 years old,” says Fraser, a dog trainer. It’s “a cozy, personalized blanket embroidered with Buster’s name on it,” and it’s a great gift for both dog and owner. “He loves having comfy blankets around to snuggle, and I love knowing that it’s a keepsake I’ll have for years and years to come.” We at the Strategist are not immune to the charm of a personalized gift, and have recommended this L.L. Bean plush blanket in the past.
I am quite satisfied with my dog’s new umbrella! She hates to get wet, and will refuse to go outside when it’s raining, so have always had to put her in a jacket & boots, and she still ends up getting somewhat wet. She has huge ears and a plumed tail that curls over her back, so even with a raincoat on, she still always got home from walks with damp ears and her tail all poofy & wet. Enter this ingenious product, and she now stays dry! The chain leash attached to the underside of the umbrella is the proper length to keep a smaller dog under the canopy. My dog is a Papillon, about 5-6 lbs, and she stayed under it just fine. Assembly was simple, though it took me a moment to figure out how to close it once opened, as I didn’t want to break it ... full review
"Molly Girl at 2 months—Molly is every bit chocolate Lab, but with none of the horror stories I was warned of! She is not super high energy, probably due in part to the daily exercise I make sure she gets. She is eager to please and extremely loyal. She greets everyone with a wag of the tail and loves to be loved on! As with any dog, consistency is important when training, and thanks to that, and dog parks, Molly is the perfect dog:)"

Pet Cams are the purrr-fect gift for someone who loves their pet because it allows them to take their pup with them wherever they go! Just plug in the camera and connect it to WiFi. Depending on the camera, the app may allow them to have two-way communications with their dog (which is especially ideal for dogs with separation anxiety who can be troublemakers while away). There are a number of live video cameras that range in price and features, but our favorite for dogs is the Pawbo because it has a built-in laser dot chasing game, treat dispenser and multiple sound effects (cat, birds, etc.). It’s on the pricey side, so be sure to check out our full PetCams review to learn more about the other camera options, too.
The first written reference to the breed was in 1814 ("Instructions to Young Sportsmen" by Colonel Peter Hawker),[11] the first painting in 1823 ("Cora. A Labrador Bitch" by Edwin Landseer),[11] and the first photograph in 1856 (the Earl of Home's dog "Nell", described both as a Labrador and a St. Johns dog).[21] By 1870 the name Labrador Retriever became common in England.[11] The first yellow Labrador on record was born in 1899 (Ben of Hyde, kennels of Major C.J. Radclyffe),[11] and the breed was recognised by The Kennel Club in 1903. The first American Kennel Club (AKC) registration was in 1917.[11] The chocolate Labrador emerged in the 1930s,[11] although liver spotted pups were documented being born at the Buccleuch kennels in 1892.[11] The first dog to appear on the cover of Life Magazine was a black Labrador Retriever called "Blind of Arden" in the December, 12th, 1938 issue. The St. John's dog survived until the early 1980s, the last two individuals being photographed in old age around 1981.[21]
In the early years of the breed through to the mid-20th century, Labradors of a shade we would now call "yellow" were in fact a dark, almost butterscotch, colour (visible in early yellow Labrador photographs). The shade was known as "Golden" until required to be changed by the UK Kennel Club, on the grounds that "Gold" was not actually a colour. Over the 20th century a preference for far lighter shades of yellow through to cream prevailed; until today most yellow Labradors are of this shade. Also fawn has been a common colour in the yellow lab variety.[25]
Zanjeer ("Chain", or "Shackles"), a detection dog who detected arms and ammunition used in the 1993 Mumbai (Bombay) serial explosions. During his service, he helped recover 57 country-made bombs, 175 petrol bombs, 11 military grade armaments, 242 grenades and 600 detonators. His biggest contribution to the police force and the city was the detection of 3,329 kg of RDX. He also helped detect 18 Type 56 rifles and five 9mm pistols.
‘Tis the season to spoil your loved ones! We’ve put together a gift guide filled with all sorts of gift ideas for dog owners, dog lovers, and, of course, your dog. With a variety of goodies for every type of dog person and their pup, we have you covered. From personalized gift packs to breed embroidered hats, jewelry, and ugly sweaters, we guarantee that every person on your list will be smiling or wagging their tail.
Ariege Pointer Blue Picardy Spaniel Bracco Italiano Braque du Bourbonnais Braque d'Auvergne Braque Français Braque Saint-Germain Brittany Ca Mè Mallorquí Cesky Fousek Drentse Patrijshond French Spaniel German Longhaired Pointer German Shorthaired Pointer German Wirehaired Pointer Large Münsterländer Old Danish Pointer Pachón Navarro Perdigueiro Galego Picardy Spaniel Portuguese Pointer Pudelpointer Saint-Usuge Spaniel Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer Small Münsterländer Spinone Italiano Stabyhoun Vizsla Weimaraner Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
Few breeds so richly deserve their popularity as does the Labrador Retriever. When trained, the breed is obedient and amiable, and tolerates the antics of children, other dogs, and other pets. The Lab is a calm house dog, playful yard dog, and intense field dog, all on the same day. Labs are eager to please, enjoyslearning, and excel in obedience. It is a powerful breed that loves to swim and retrieve. Labradors needs daily physical and mental challenges to keep occupied. A bored Lab can get into trouble! The Labrador’s hunting instinct can drive a dog to roam, so training and a safe yard are needed.
Labrador colouration is controlled by multiple genes. It is possible for recessive genes to re-emerge in later generations. Also, there can sometimes be unexpected pigmentation effects to different parts of the body. Pigmentation effects appear in regard to yellow Labradors, and sometimes chocolate, and hence the majority of this section covers pigmentation within the yellow Labrador. The most common places where pigmentation is visible are the nose, lips, gums, feet, tail, and the rims of the eyes, which may be black, brown, light yellow-brown ("liver", caused by having two genes for chocolate),[39] or several other colours. A Labrador can carry genes for a different colour, for example a black Labrador can carry recessive chocolate and yellow genes, and a yellow Labrador can carry recessive genes for the other two colours. DNA testing can reveal some aspects of these. Less common pigmentations (other than pink) are a fault, not a disqualification, and hence such dogs are still permitted to be shown.[39]
Named the “Labrador” in 1887 by the Earl of Malmesbury—an English hunter and breeder—the Lab actually originated in 18th-century Newfoundland, Canada. At the time two breeds emerged from the St. John’s Water Dog: the Greater Newfoundland and the Lesser Newfoundland. The Greater Newfoundland dogs worked in teams hauling fish, but the Lesser Newfoundland had a rugged friendliness that fishermen valued. Fishermen marveled that these smaller Newfoundlands kept their can-do attitude even after long days retrieving nets from the sea, playing happily with children back when returning to shore. Soon, these dogs came to Poole, England—the Newfoundland fishing-trade hub—where hunters and sportsmen honed them into skilled hunters and retrievers. In 1903 the English Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as an official breed. The American Kennel Club certified the breed in 1917.
Honor the pet lovers in your life with custom gifts created just for them! You know they’re always thinking about their four-legged friends, so you know they’ll appreciate a gift that will remind them of their precious pets. Easily customize unique gifts for dog lovers, like our popular Definition of My Dog blankets, pillows and other home décor accessories. Or create one-of-a-kind gifts for cat lovers by adding their pets’ names, photos and more. Personalize key chains, coffee mugs, canvas totes and other practical items pet owners can use every day. Or surprise them with beautiful keepsake gifts they’ll want to hang on to for many years to come.
Labrador Retrievers are registered in three colours:[28] black (a solid black colour), yellow (considered from cream to fox-red), and chocolate (medium to dark brown). Some dogs are sold as silver pure-bred Labradors, but purity of those bloodlines is currently disputed by breed experts including breed clubs and breed councils.[32][33] Some major kennel clubs around the world allow silver Labradors to be registered, but not as silver. The Kennel Club (England) requires that they be registered as "Non-recognised."[34] Occasionally, Labradors will exhibit small amounts of white fur on their chest, paws, or tail, and rarely a purebred Lab will exhibit brindling stripes or tan points similar to a Rottweiler.[35] These markings are a disqualification for show dogs but do not have any bearing on the dog's temperament or ability to be a good working or pet dog.
If you tend to take your dog on frequent adventures, investing in protection for your car will help with any muddy, mucky, or wet mess from your furry friend. The BarksBar Luxury Pet Car Seat Cover is ideal for cars without a trunk that they can hop into. The cover is convertible between a regular seat cover or hammock-style with full protection over the middle seats and back of the front seats, as well as the floor. There is enough space for your pooch to sit, lay down, or stick their nose up front. With a built-in rubber backing and seat anchors, the waterproof cover won’t slip around even as your dog moves around.
Labrador colouration is controlled by multiple genes. It is possible for recessive genes to re-emerge in later generations. Also, there can sometimes be unexpected pigmentation effects to different parts of the body. Pigmentation effects appear in regard to yellow Labradors, and sometimes chocolate, and hence the majority of this section covers pigmentation within the yellow Labrador. The most common places where pigmentation is visible are the nose, lips, gums, feet, tail, and the rims of the eyes, which may be black, brown, light yellow-brown ("liver", caused by having two genes for chocolate),[39] or several other colours. A Labrador can carry genes for a different colour, for example a black Labrador can carry recessive chocolate and yellow genes, and a yellow Labrador can carry recessive genes for the other two colours. DNA testing can reveal some aspects of these. Less common pigmentations (other than pink) are a fault, not a disqualification, and hence such dogs are still permitted to be shown.[39]
Like many of us, I have an older dog that I adore. The last few months especially, his signs of aging seem to be increasing faster and faster. He started losing his appetite in the mornings and just wasn't himself. He's an 11-1/2 year old ridgeback and I get that larger dogs don't live forever, but I wanted to do EVERYTHING I could to keep him happy and healthy. I read the reviews on this product and decided to give it a try. My boy has now been on this for about a month and a half and I am starting to see subtle improvements. I don't have to beg and cajole him to eat breakfast and he just seems to have perked up a bit. I'm not saying this is a "fountain of youth" product, but it does seem to be ... full review
Amy Tokic, Editor of PetGuide.com, is a passionate animal lover and proud pet parent of Oscar, a Shih Tzu/Chihuahua cross. Her love of animals began in kindergarten, when she brought her stuffed dog Snoopy into class with her every day. Now, she writes about her adventures in pet ownership and tirelessly researches products, news and health related issues she can share with other animal enthusiasts. In her free time, Amy loves perusing used book and record stores, obsessing over the latest pet products available and chasing squirrels with wild abandon (a habit attributed to spending too much time with Oscar).
Breeders should sell puppies with a written contract guaranteeing they'll take back the dog at any time during his life if you become unable to keep him, and with written documentation that both the puppy's parents (and if possible, his other close relatives) have had their hips, eyes and elbows examined and certified by the appropriate health organizations. Seek out a breeder whose dogs are active in field trials, hunt tests, agility, obedience and other sports that require athleticism and good health, and not just ribbons from the show ring.

This floor pillow is as comfortable as it is cute. Made with 100% polyester for a soft touch, this pillow is overstuffed with firm-yet-plush fill to ensure that it never loses shape. Suitable for a dorm room or bedroom – even a living room or family room – this pillow is a great complement to the Dogs are Weird wall clock. Pair them up for a unique gift set.
Labs typically have litters of six to eight puppies. Most breeders like to keep puppies until they are at least eight weeks old. This gives the puppies time to learn how to behave toward other dogs and gives the breeder time to evaluate the puppies’ personalities so she can place each one in just the right home. A bonus is that puppies of this age are more mature and more easily housetrained.
Labrador Retrievers love, love, love to eat, and become obese very quickly if overfed. Limit treats, give your Lab plenty of exercise, and measure out regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. And be warned that the Lab's large appetite extends to people food and even inedible items. Labradors will forage in garbage, counter surf, and can make a meal out of chewed-up items like children's toys.

Pet Cams are the purrr-fect gift for someone who loves their pet because it allows them to take their pup with them wherever they go! Just plug in the camera and connect it to WiFi. Depending on the camera, the app may allow them to have two-way communications with their dog (which is especially ideal for dogs with separation anxiety who can be troublemakers while away). There are a number of live video cameras that range in price and features, but our favorite for dogs is the Pawbo because it has a built-in laser dot chasing game, treat dispenser and multiple sound effects (cat, birds, etc.). It’s on the pricey side, so be sure to check out our full PetCams review to learn more about the other camera options, too.


Andrea Romano is a freelance writer and video editor in New York. She has worked for several publications, including Mashable, Travel + Leisure, and Bustle, as well as Brit + Co. She received her BA in Theater from the University of Northern Colorado and a Master’s degree in Media Studies and Film from The New School. When she is not working, she is writing sketch comedy and storytelling through The People's Improv Theatre and loves to knit and play music.
Andrea Romano is a freelance writer and video editor in New York. She has worked for several publications, including Mashable, Travel + Leisure, and Bustle, as well as Brit + Co. She received her BA in Theater from the University of Northern Colorado and a Master’s degree in Media Studies and Film from The New School. When she is not working, she is writing sketch comedy and storytelling through The People's Improv Theatre and loves to knit and play music.
The hardest thing about putting a gift guide together is resisting the urge to buy every single item on it for myself (thanks to my self-restraint, I only gave way to one). And it was no different for the Top 10 Must-Have Dog Mom Gifts. Being a dog mom, I picked things I wouldn’t normally purchase, but since it is Mother’s Day, I would treat myself to. It’s a tough job, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world. Still, it would be nice to be recognized, and since Oscar isn’t going to make me a crappy macaroni-laden card any time soon, I don’t feel guilty about splurging for any of these awesome Dog Mom Gifts.

While most shelters and rescues cannot determine a dog's exact breed, some facilities may utilize DNA tests to determine the genetics of a mixed breed dog, and AKC registered Labs may be surrendered to a shelter. Even with proof that a dog's heritage includes Labrador Retrievers—and though the dog may show the physical characteristics of the breed—the individual dogs' personality traits may differ from the breed standard.
Sh*t happens, and when it does your dog loving friend will be thankful they won’t have to bend over backward to pick it up thanks to Nature’s Miracle Jaw Scoop, our #1 pick in our Best Pooper Scooper. It’s lightweight, picks up from all surfaces and has non-stick plastic, so your friend won’t be stuck in a stinky situation. It’s an affordable and memorable gift idea!

As with some other breeds, the Conformation (typically "Show", "English" or "bench") and the Field (typically "Working" or "American") lines differ, although both lines are bred in both countries. In general, however, Conformation Labradors tend to be bred as medium-sized dogs, shorter and stockier with fuller faces and a slightly calmer nature than their Field counterparts, which are often bred as taller, lighter-framed dogs, with slightly less broad faces and a slightly longer nose. However, Field Labradors should still be proportional and fit within American Kennel Club standards. With Field Labradors, excessively long noses, thin heads, long legs, and lanky frames are not considered standard. These two types are informal and not codified or standardised; no distinction is made by the AKC or other kennel clubs, but the two types come from different breeding lines. Australian stock also exists; though not seen in the West, they are common in Asia. These dogs are also very good with children.
This cake toy is fun for taking pictures on your dog's birthday. We got some adorable pics of our little guy when he turned 1, but as soon as the song started playing, I realized that it was going to be a short-lived toy (because if he didn't destroy it, I would). It plays the Happy Birthday song in a high-pitched tone over and over again - like 4 times in a row. I have no idea what the manufacturers were thinking, because one time would have been more than enough, especially since it keeps getting triggered as the dog plays with it. I'm not even sure if there's a way to get the batteries out - I looked but couldn't figure it out (although that may have been because I was doing it one-handed, as I covered my ears with the other hand).
We got our Sandy, our golden lab many years ago. The best advice my vet told me was he needs to run and explore and be a dog, Living on a farm, free to explore and live as he should. Not in an apartment, not in a cage but enjoying the outdoors. My Sandy passed away last week and it fills my heart with love knowing he had a wonderful, adventurous life with no obstacles to his freedoms.

The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. He's outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals. Aside from a winning personality, he has the intelligence and eagerness to please that make him easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means he is active. This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep him happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: some are rowdy, others are more laid back. All thrive on activity.


Labrador retrievers are easily recognized by their broad head, drop ears and large, expressive eyes. Two trademarks of the Lab are the thick but fairly short double coat, which is very water repellent, and the well known "otter tail." The tail is thick and sturdy and comes off the topline almost straight. The feet are described as "webbed," with longer skin between the toes to aid in swimming. Color can range from black through chocolate to a red/yellow or even almost white.
Ruffwear Car Hammock: If you ever take your dog in the car and don’t know about hammock-style seat covers you will be kicking yourself when you check these out - I’ve used them for years. This is the best way to go for both the dog and the car, period. These hook to the headrests behind and in front of the back seat, giving the dog more room by turning the otherwise wasted leg space into an extension of the seat surface. They catch all the dirt, come in and out of the car in seconds, and can be washed in the machine, while leaving the seat underneath totally clean. While the concept is great, I went through a few bargain versions that eventually broke (usually the headrest strap) before I found Ruffwear’s Dirtbag seat cover, which has several advantages. First off, it’s tough, durable and totally waterproof - even for the muddiest dog. Secondly, it has ingenious extra flaps that slide into the space in the seat where the seatbelts are, something I have seen on no other model, which better anchors the installation and makes it lay flat, creating more usable surface area. It has convenient zippered slots where seatbelts come through, and also works very well on bench style seats without a front headrest, like in a minivan or large SUV. Finally, extra side flaps keep the ends of the seat by the door clean, and the non-slip surface is easier on your dogs. Highly recommended!
"We watch The Dog Whisperer frequently, and we know what he means when he says to pick the pup out of the litter that is the most laid back. Most people go and pick out a dog based on their playful attitude because if a pup runs up to them they think the pup "chose them" when really it is just probably going to be a more challenging, hyper pup. We know this information now, but we did not know it when we went to get Bruno (or when we picked out our first two dogs), however he was the last male puppy left so we did not have a choice. I asked my husband why he thought Bruno was the last male left out of the litter and we later realized it was probably because he did not come leaping and bounding up to the other callers. The people that owned the pups had to go pick him up and bring him to us because he just sat at a distance observing the activity. When we first brought him home he went and sat in the corner all by himself after allowing the other dogs to greet him. We thought it was because he was so young and he was in a new environment. As the weeks passed Bruno was easily housetrained, never chewed anything up, and never "got in our face" for attention as the other dogs that we have liked to do. To this day if he wants attention he will just come and lie at our feet or sit by our side calmly. If we do not acknowledge his presence he will go lie by the door. When we took Bruno for his first set of shots, the vet said that he was extremely calm for a Lab puppy and said that he "was 1 in 100." Bruno will be 1 year old in January and we still have one of the best behaved dogs in the world with him."
An early report by a Colonel Hawker described the dog as "by far the best for any kind of shooting. He is generally black and no bigger than a Pointer, very fine in legs, with short, smooth hair and does not carry his tail so much curled as the other; is extremely quick, running, swimming and fighting....and their sense of smell is hardly to be credited...."[17]
Don’t let your tiny dog turn into one of those hoity-toity fashion accessories Paris Hilton used to carry around. Toss it into this heavy-duty canvas tote instead, which is both better-looking than your mesh carrier and not nearly as eye roll-inducing as a purse. There’s even a cutout on the side, so Finn can stick his head out without getting caught in the zipper.
Zanjeer ("Chain", or "Shackles"), a detection dog who detected arms and ammunition used in the 1993 Mumbai (Bombay) serial explosions. During his service, he helped recover 57 country-made bombs, 175 petrol bombs, 11 military grade armaments, 242 grenades and 600 detonators. His biggest contribution to the police force and the city was the detection of 3,329 kg of RDX. He also helped detect 18 Type 56 rifles and five 9mm pistols.
As an avid animal lover, discover special items for your four?legged friend. Complement your home d‚cor with a precious picture of your most loving companion. With so many photo frames to choose from, you will find the perfect frame to display your favorite picture of your pet. As a loving pet owner, discover the perfect pendant to celebrate the love you share with your pet. Crafted from stainless steel, choose a unique paw print design to show your love for your adorable dog or a sophisticated cat silhouette pendant for your furry feline friend. Memorial stones honor the memory of a beloved pet and we have so many choices, you will be sure to find the garden stone that's just right for you. Let the world know how special the love you share with your pet is, and now it's never been easier with an almost endless selection of gifts for pet lovers.
Labradors are an intelligent breed with a good work ethic and generally good temperaments. Common working roles for Labradors include: hunting, tracking and detection (they have a great sense of smell which helps when working in these areas), disabled-assistance, carting, and therapy work.[53] Approximately 60–70% of all guide dogs in Canada are Labradors; other common breeds are Golden Retrievers and German Shepherds.[54] Labrador Retrievers have proven to have a high success rate at becoming guide dogs. A study was recently done on how well four different breeds (Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever/Golden Retriever Mix, and German Shepherds) trained to become guide dogs. In this experiment, German Shepherds had the highest chance of not completing it. Labrador Retrievers and Labrador Retriever/Golden Retriever Mix had the highest success rate. However, German Shepherds and Golden Retrievers had a higher success rate after going through longer training than the training required for Labrador Retrievers.[55][56]
Labs typically have litters of six to eight puppies. Most breeders like to keep puppies until they are at least eight weeks old. This gives the puppies time to learn how to behave toward other dogs and gives the breeder time to evaluate the puppies’ personalities so she can place each one in just the right home. A bonus is that puppies of this age are more mature and more easily housetrained.
Although not a new product, Canine Journal team members have used Embark and other dog DNA tests to better understand their rescue pups and are big fans. We think it’s the wave of the future and encourage you to give the gift of knowledge and health to your favorite furry friend this season. Embark is our #1 pick for best dog DNA kit (and they are having a big holiday sale through the end of the year!).
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